The Importance Of Free Will In The Franklins Tale

Saturday, April 16, 2022 10:35:09 AM

The Importance Of Free Will In The Franklins Tale



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Determinism vs Free Will: Crash Course Philosophy #24

Isaacson's biographical sketch of Franklin is both thorough and entertaining, keeping the reader away from the quagmires of the mundane while not skimming over key aspects. Full of wonderful insights throughout, Isaacson shows the attention to detail and extensive research he undertook to weave this together. With strong themes and exceptionally off the wall observations that Franklin's fathering of William led to two additional generations of bastard children begetting bastards keep the reader pushing forward with interest and awe, rather than out of a sense of necessity. Like the previous figure Isaacson tackled that I have already read Steve Jobs , the man appears to come alive through the author's wonderful prose. Kudos, Mr. Isaacson for your sensational biography.

I cannot wait to sink my teeth into your other political juggernaut Kissinger or scientist Einstein. View all 4 comments. Nov 22, Jason Koivu rated it really liked it Shelves: biography , non-fiction , history. An excellent start-to-finish biography, Benjamin Franklin: An American Life begins by touching on his childhood as best as it can considering the lack of material to work with. After that, Isaacson takes the reader through a more detailed account of Franklin's early entrepreneurial life, through his many inventions, and into his later statesmen days. I was struck by the author's well-balanced hand for both time, achievements, personal and professional details, and philosophical and political ide An excellent start-to-finish biography, Benjamin Franklin: An American Life begins by touching on his childhood as best as it can considering the lack of material to work with.

I was struck by the author's well-balanced hand for both time, achievements, personal and professional details, and philosophical and political ideology. The importance of his work as a diplomat, an enchanting and emotional time in Franklin's life well dramatized by Isaacson, finally struck home to me. Benjamin Franklin provides a nice, concise, well-rounded look at a well-rounded man. View 1 comment. Excellent biography which pays homage to the dense and intense life of Benjamin Franklin. His scientific discoveries, of course, with his famous kite, and his "social" inventions, such as the post office or the firefighters, will contribute to the unification of the States of America.

A very well documented biography. A few lengths in places but nothing prohibitive. View all 3 comments. Shelves: usa , leaders , audible , bio , history , read. If you want his biographical details you need not even read a book, just check out Wikipedia. I wanted more. I wanted to understand his soul. I wanted to get under his skin. I wanted all the historical details in Wikipedia and more. I got what I wanted. Benjamin was an amazing person; people have only a ETA: I decided to change this to four stars since I enjoyed the author's Einstein even more, and I gave that four.

Benjamin was an amazing person; people have only a superficial idea of who he really was. He is the guy who invented the lighting pole, that jolly fat man with a twinkle in his eye. He is the only person to have signed and extensively worked on the Declaration of Independence, the Peace Accord with England and the Treaty with France following the Revolution and the American Constitution. So this is a man of politics, you surmise. Yes, he was, but he was so much more. It is the breadth of all that he did that is so amazing. This is a man who changed history in not one way or two ways or merely ten ways. The world would not be the same today without this man. He has shaped the American character, given us wide ranging inventions and, yes, signed all those documents.

This is not a review of who Benjamin is, for that read this book. It is thorough. It is interesting. It is funny, and this is because Benjamin has made some outrageously amusing comments. He was a fantastic storyteller. We are not only told this but given numerous examples. The book follows a chronological path from birth to death and is concluded with a fantastic epilogue that synthesizes all the diverse threads. The book has everything you may want to know about this man, but not too much either! That is quite a feat. I have one complaint, but it does not warrant the removal of the fifth star.

My gut feeling is that the book is amazing. The author clearly admires Benjamin, and yet he does clearly point out his weak characteristics and mistakes. I quite simply wish he had more emphatically underlined the fact that although Benjamin extolled virtue and the merit of helping others, he failed so miserably in how he treated those of his family. He had all these rules of good conduct and yet he failed to be a good father and husband. The author doesn't hide is failings, but I wanted a stronger statement that revealed the disparity between what he preached and what he did! There I have said it. Benjamin was in fact a very cruel person in relation to his family, and sometimes he was very selfish and ungenerous. Why did he abandon his family and remain in Europe for fifteen years?

In my mind, it was only when he finally realized he would be given neither the Ohio land grant nor the coveted office in charge of the colonies, that he returned. His reasons for remaining in Europe had been very selfish. I wanted that to be said clearly. The narration of the audiobook by Nelson Runger was good but not excellent. He spoke clearly and slowly. I like slow narrations, but I was slightly irritated by his need to audibly swallow the saliva in his mouth. Neither do I think his female intonations were appealing. I am being very picky. These criticisms should not deter you from listening to the audiobook! An excellent book about Benjamin Franklin. You will be surprised at learning this is a man who has much more depth and importance than you ever imagined.

This only makes the book MORE accurate. Parts tend to be a bit preachy. Lists of the adages printed in his Poor Richard Almanacs drone on a bit too long. These almanacs were profitable, definitely a financial success. The moralizing about how to achieve virtue is a bit boring. Benjamin has even devised a "Moral Perfection Project"! He seems sometimes a bit inflated. OK, he also admits to his tendency of being too proud and adds the rule that one must try to remain humble.

Anyhow, all this moralizing gets a bit hard to swallow. The author also makes it very clear that Benjamin employs humor to achieve his goals, but his humor can become quite nasty. He adds gossip columns to his paper. Sex tidbits and crime always attract readers, so they are added too. Somehow all the moralizing about proper behavior is explained away when profits are to be made. Yes, Benjamin is a pragmatist. He usually can find a convenient explanation for why what he does is acceptable.

He states that gossip leads to virtue since it puts an end to improper behavior! He does admit though it must be used with discretion I am not looking for a fairy tale about Benjamin but the real truth, so I am not complaining. Only through chapter two: Finally a book that really draws my attention and makes me happy to be reading!! I am quite sure that this book will please. The information is clear and the author mentions details that are interesting. I am reading this book because I want to know who Benjamin Franklin was. By that I mean what kind of personality did he have, how would he instinctively react in a given situation and what are his weakness and charms. I want to know him as a blood and flesh friend; friend because I am already enchanted by his directness, dislike of elitism, humor, industriousness and ability to "bend rules".

Books were important to Benjamin. He was a youth of the Enlightenment, which appeals to me too. He lived from He enjoyed Daniel Defoe's writing and shared his principles. Here is an amusing detail: Defoe thought there should be established institutions for the mentally retarded. The amusing part is that he felt a tax should be levied on authors to pay for these residences. Because clearly authors had been blessed with more brain matter than the retarded. They should thus care for those more poorly endowed! Benjamin was a vegetarian, at least for a while. He was not a vegetarian for moral reasons. By saving his money, eating less expensively, he could buy more books. Again, books are important! But then, on a boat trip, the cod sizzling on the grill smell "mmmm" so good!

When filleting the fish, smaller fish had been found in the gut of the larger one, the one being cooked. He then conveniently reasoned: "If you eat one another, I don't see why we cannot eat you! Also he was on his way to a better paying job. Clearly it helps that I like Benjamin's ability to poke fun at both himself and what he saw around him. I enjoy his tendency to rationalize, albeit in a manner that is "convenient". He knew quite well he was simply finding a convincing reason for doing exactly what he wanted.

I like this book because almost every paragraph throws in extraneous information that interests me. I didn't know that Puritanism was an effort to cleanse remnant Catholic practices from Protestantism. Puritans wanted to "purify" Protestantism. Reading this book, I am given much more than mere facts about Benjamin Franklin's life. I am listening to the audiobook narrated by Nelson Runger. He speaks clearly and very slowly. This allows one time to take small introspective excursions as you listen, and this I like to do. If you do not like glacial narrations, perhaps you should read the paper form of the book. Listening to a book often takes longer than reading the book. View all 97 comments. Dec 17, T-bone rated it did not like it.

The only time this book caught my attention was when I fell asleep reading it in bed and dropped it on my face. I stopped reading before I hurt myself further. This fascinating insight on page 82 was the last straw, "For the last 17 years of Deborah's life, Franklin would be away, including when she died. Nevertheless, their mutual affection, respect, and loyalty - and their sense of partnership - would endure.

View 2 comments. Shelves: history , non-fiction , ultimate-reading-list , biography , science. This was a pleasure and just the kind of biography I find trustworthy. The kind that acknowledges other views and controversies and with extensive notes and sources in the back. More than that, it's the rare biography that can inspire smiles and even giggles--I'd mark this up to five stars if I could credit Isaacson for that--but the source of the humor is the frequent quotes from Benjamin Franklin himself. Isaacson said in his introduction that "Benjamin Franklin is the Founding Father who wink This was a pleasure and just the kind of biography I find trustworthy. Isaacson said in his introduction that "Benjamin Franklin is the Founding Father who winks at us" and that proved to be so--his pragmatism and humor is the keynote to his character.

Before reading this, if someone asked me which Founding Father I'd chose to have dinner and conversation with I think I would have chosen Jefferson. After this it's hard not to name Franklin as a favorite and the one with the most winning personality--at least if you weren't married to him. Or one of his children. Franklin has his faults, goodness knows, and Isaacson doesn't gloss over them, but they just make him all the more poignantly human.

I've heard it said that the Revolutionary War was really a civil war given how the lines between Patriots versus Loyalists cut through families. Of all the Founding Fathers, the cut was sharpest with Benjamin Franklin--his own son was the King's Governor of New Jersey and chose the opposing side. I did know that before reading this biography but there was plenty I didn't know--for instance that this man so identified with Philadelphia was born and grew up in Boston and spent so many years in England as well as Paris. Isaacson, who wrote biographies of Einstein and Steve Jobs, does justice to not just Franklin the statesman but the inventor and scientist as well. And throughout and especially in his epilogue gives us not just an assessment of the man but the biography of how he was received by others such as Sinclair Lewis, D.

Lawrence and John Updike. An engaging and lively biography. View all 6 comments. I loved this book. Isaacson did a fair and balanced job, describing the man without whitewashing over his flaws. By the end, I felt like Franklin was mine, like he somehow belonged to me. I knew he would be an interesting person, but I had no idea how much this man did with his life. Nor did I understand just how involved he was before there was any US at all. We could still be a British colony without him - or even a French one!

Something else I never learned in school, France's involvement. Th I loved this book. This is the opposite of a dry history book. This is real life, described in such a way that you feel like you were a part of it, and know all of the players. When Franklin left France for the last time, toward the end of his life, there were tears in my eyes. This from a confirmed history dummy who has never had an interest! Well, that's all changed now. Thank you, Mr. Isaacson, for making this old patriot leap off the pages, and for making me know and really care for him, and for history, for the first time in my life. You deserve a gold star for sure.

Jul 12, Jerome rated it liked it. Biographies generally bore me, and this was no exception. So pedestrian, so conventional, so obviously a poor rehashing of much better Franklin biographies that preceded this one. One wonders why Isaacson even bothered to write the book. Money, perhaps? Whatever his motivation, the result is underwhelming. One of the difficulties with biography is that you already know most of the plot, and you probably know how it ends too. To create a sense of suspense and excitement, you need to need to do two Biographies generally bore me, and this was no exception. To create a sense of suspense and excitement, you need to need to do two things. First, you need to construct a "plot" that is more than just a chain of events - you need to turn this life into some kind of story.

Second, you need to add enough originality and insight to give the reader something they hadn't thought of before - a new twist on a familiar tale. Isaacson does neither. He follows Franklin from cradle to grave, covering his life with reasonable thoroughness, some attention to alternative sources and points of view, and with excellent command of English grammar and vocabulary. For this he is to be commended - his experience as a successful journalist shows.

However, he has not managed to create anything that pulls the reader a long - neither the "what next" plot nor the "what will he tell me next" insights. The fault of the book, then, is its subject, but how Isaacson writes about him. Its chief fault is the lack of narrative flair: With the notable exception of the first and last chapters, we have a chronological account broken into small sections. At times the book's equally weighted, well-ordered facts yield a pace that is both plodding and boring. The book is best when it manages to integrate larger themes with the strictly biographical details.

View all 5 comments. Apr 20, Suzanne rated it really liked it Shelves: american-history , biography. This is a throroughly entertaining, well-researched, well-written biography of Benjamin Franklin by Walter Isaacson. It is lengthy over pages and one feels obligated to read the footnotes because they further the work. The first third of the book moved quickly childhood, moving to Philadelphia, beginning life as a printer, Poor Richard's Almanac. The middle third bogs down life in England and France, the beginning of the Revolution and the final third picks up back in France, negotiat This is a throroughly entertaining, well-researched, well-written biography of Benjamin Franklin by Walter Isaacson.

The middle third bogs down life in England and France, the beginning of the Revolution and the final third picks up back in France, negotiating the peace etc I realized while reading this that I had many preconceptions based on rumor regarding Franklin. Yes he was flirt and loved women, but there was only one illegitimate child not the rumored hundreds and he William Franklin became the Governor of New Jersey. Franklin's wife Deborah with whom he had 2 children, Sally and a son who died as a child was "common-law" because she had been abandoned by her husband who disappeared to the Carribean. Divorce was illegal and without a death certificate, she could not remarry.

It appears that he loved her but she would not travel with him and never left Philadelphia. So he went alone, and often stayed away for years. Sadly, despite her wish for him to return, he was in Europe for the last 15 years of her life. Hard to fathom. On a political level much of what our country is can be attributed to Franklin's vision and support of a middle class. Jefferson, who founded the University of Virginia, believed that the role of education was to train the future leaders of the world by handpicking the best and brightest, and giving them the best education. Franklin totally disagreed believing that educational opportunities needed to be available to all, and based his founding of the University of Pennsylvania on those principles.

Meritocracy, hard work, frugality Isaacson has a great writing style. Not a quick read, but really enjoyable. Dec 04, Dan rated it it was amazing. An excellent biography of America's greatest statesman. As told in this litany by Isaacson, it was astonishing to learn that so many principles of our government and constitution are in whole or in part Franklin's ideas or were ideas that Franklin advocated for. I would say that the second half of this book, Franklin as the elder statesman, was as perfect a biography as I have read. Aug 13, Margaretann rated it really liked it. Went to the King Tut exhibit in and was equally impressed by the Ben Franklin museum - where the exhibit was shown in PA. Loved this book; learned so much - maybe I'm a nerd but it was a page turner that I looked forward to each day!

Jan 11, Brad Feld rated it it was amazing Shelves: biography. Isaacson is great at making a biography Ben Franklin is one of my heroes, along with Albert Einstein, Richard Feynman, and a few others. Isaacson is great at making a biography flow easily so it reads like a cross between a novel and a non-fiction book. While everyone knows about his role in the American Revolution, American postmaster, printer, experiments with lightening, and invention of bifocals and the Franklin stove, here are a few that are not commonly known. The early Franklin was well-known for the virtues he stated and then worked on personally, not all at once, but systematically over time.

When I reflect on them, I find them remarkably contemporary. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty.

Avoid extremes; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. Imitate Jesus and Socrates. His personal life was fascinating, complex, and non-traditional. But, after all, we are all bags of chemicals and have lots of flaws.

His skills as a politician and negotiator were just awesome. His ability to stay calm in intense situations was awe inspiring. In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes. Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise. Although paths may cross, as we head in diverging directions we can wave to each other for a while, but eventually, mostly, we lose sight of those who have traveled too far on that other bye-way. The baby-daddy, Aubrey, steps up, but, really, Iris does not think he is a long-term commitment she wants to make.

When she looked into her future, she saw college and some fancy job somewhere where she dressed cute and drank good wine at a restaurant after work. There were always candles in her future—candlelit tables and bathtubs and bedrooms. One impact of history is how the Tulsa Massacre, specifically, cascades down through the generations, driving family members to achieve, and to zealously protect what they have gained, ever knowledgeable that everything might be taken from them at any time. Melody is named for her great-grandmother, who suffered in the Tulsa Massacre. How they came with intention. How the only thing they wanted was to see us gone.

Our money gone. Our shops and schools and libraries—everything—just good and gone. And even though it happened twenty years before I was even a thought, I carry it. I carry the goneness. Iris carries the goneness. And watching her walk down those stairs, I know now that my grandbaby carries the goneness too. Goneness appears in other forms, when Iris leaves her Catholic school, and, later, heads off to college. Who among us does not have music associated with the events of our life? Most good novels offer a bit of reflection on the narrative process.

There are many moments in this book that reach deep. In a favorite of these, Aubrey remembers the pedestrian things he liked in his peripatetic single-parent childhood, a Whitman-esque litany of physical experience, capped with an image of fleeting, unsurpassed beauty, and desperate longing that well mirrors his love for Iris, and is absolutely heart-wrenching.

Red at the Bone is a tapestry, with larger images, created with threads that are woven in and out, and drawn together to form a glorious whole. You will see on second, third, or further readings flickers here that reflect events from there, see the threads that had gone unnoticed on prior readings. It is a magnificent book, remarkably compact, but so, so rich. Surely one of the best books of She took me to her castle and I just couldn't believe my eyes, She had so many devices everything that money could buy, She said "sign your name on the dotted line. Nikki The castle started spinning or maybe it wa my brain. I can't tell you what she did to me but my body will never be the same.

Awe, her lovin will kick your behind, she'll show you no mercy But she'll sure 'nough, sure 'nough show you how to grind Come on Nikki I woke up the next morning, Nikki wasn't there. I looked all… Sometimes the world's a storm. One day soon the storm will pass And all will be bright and peaceful. Fearlessly bathe in the, Purple rain Source: LyricFind View all 24 comments. I loved it. Loved everything about this book. The gorgeous prose. The way in just a relatively few pages, Woodsen managed to flesh out her characters, making them autentic people. The themes explored. Themes of mother, daughter relationships, teenage pregnant, ambition, fatherhood and sexual identity. The many different emotions she manages to provoke, emotions that changed as the story progressed.

How young people make decisions about their lives, things that will affect them in the future, not I loved it. How young people make decisions about their lives, things that will affect them in the future, not realizing what that entails. So many issues are covered, yet done so well that it never felt crowded. Life and death, lives lived. Some give up more for love, some are not able to give enough. I loved it because it felt authentic, real. It takes you back to where you were, and just lets you be there for a while. ARC from Netgalley and Riverhead books. View all 41 comments. Jun 11, emma rated it really liked it Shelves: non-ya , 4-stars , diverse , library , recommend , owned , historical , reviewed , authors-of-color , literary-fiction.

I am a sucker for a short book. This is not because I am lazy - okay, yes, it's because I'm lazy. I enjoy finishing a book per day and I also enjoy spending large portions of my day playing Animal Crossing and listening to podcasts. Sue me. But I also find it so much more impressive when a small story can pack the punch of a long one. If I can care about the characters, feel invested in the story, really connect with the book, then I feel connected to it all the more for how quickly it managed to I am a sucker for a short book. If I can care about the characters, feel invested in the story, really connect with the book, then I feel connected to it all the more for how quickly it managed to do that.

This is a prime example of that. Bottom line: Short books forever!!! Also, short reviews forever!!! View all 21 comments. Sep 20, JanB vacation till Oct 18 rated it liked it Shelves: edelweiss , reads , audiobook. This is a look at the effects of teenage pregnancy on two families, one well-off, the other poor. Told through shifting time periods and multiple perspectives of the parents, grandparents, and the child, the writing itself is worthy of 5 stars. I appreciated the themes as well as the push against stereotypes. The author set out to do what she intended with this book but, for me, the story itself was good, but not memorable. It will be quickly forgotten.

I'm in the minority as many readers love t This is a look at the effects of teenage pregnancy on two families, one well-off, the other poor. I'm in the minority as many readers love this one so be sure to check out other reviews. View all 75 comments. Feb 09, Paromjit rated it it was amazing Shelves: family-drama , netgalley , contemporary-fiction. Jacqueline Woodson's writes a profoundly lyrical inter-generational black family drama, its history, of race, class, the trials and tribulations of being alive, of identity, sexuality, love, loss, grief and ambition.

It begins with the coming of age of Melody, her 16th birthday, wearing a dress that her mother, Iris, never got to wear, at the tender age of 15, Iris was pregnant with Melody. Woodson uses this family event to weave a moving web of family history and interconnections in a narrative Jacqueline Woodson's writes a profoundly lyrical inter-generational black family drama, its history, of race, class, the trials and tribulations of being alive, of identity, sexuality, love, loss, grief and ambition. Woodson uses this family event to weave a moving web of family history and interconnections in a narrative that deftly illustrates how the past is writ large in the present, continuing to shape the future.

The repercussions of a teen pregnancy, an Iris for whom motherhood is not enough and abandons Melody to be lovingly brought up by her steadfast, contented and committed father, Aubrey, and her grandparents Sabe and Sammy. It takes in the impact of the Tulsa race massacres, driving the family to relocate and triggering its focus on ambition. Woodson's stellar novel imprints itself indelibly on my memory with its insightful and acute observations that go into highlighting the complexities and complications of family. She has a real gift in characterisation with so few words, bringing a humanity and authenticity to the people who inhabit the book. This may well be a short novel, but it is epic in scale, containing such beautiful imagery, with an underlying sense of universality when it comes to family, of what it takes to survive and endure, the importance of remembering, the tragedies, the heartbreak and the joy and hope too.

A poignantly stitched together multilayered reconstruction of a specific family and its past amidst which lies the history of a nation. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Orion for an ARC. Oct 14, Jen rated it it was amazing Shelves: 5-star-favourites. This story is raw with emotion. A child who is turning 16 and having a coming of age party evokes the memories of her from her mom, when she had her at 16, her dad - just a kid himself, grandma who raised her as her own daughter, and grandpa who loved her to death. The themes of racism, education, teenage pregnancy.

The costs each of them endured during the course of their lives. All these memor This story is raw with emotion. All these memories arrive at this single moment in time. Beautifully written and emotionally captivating. This one is sure to tug at the heart strings. View all 47 comments. Jan 02, Zoeytron rated it liked it Shelves: public-library. I was not able to grab the golden ring with this novel that so many of my fellow reviewers did.

The format in which it was written came across as choppy to me and did not allow me to become fully immersed in the story. And thus, I flounder against the tide this time. I do respect the story's message of the appreciation of life and love, and the acceptance of what just is. View all 36 comments. Sep 12, Debbie rated it it was amazing Shelves: family-drama , edelweiss , almost-all-time-faves , best-readsthrough , black-writers , luscious-spines-live-in-my-bookcase , bookcase-of-faves-at-home , historical-fiction.

This book, oh this book! Where has this phenomenal writer been all my life? Oh what she can do with words! I started reading, and POW, I was immediately in love. The language! It grabbed me fast and it held me tight. Woodson is a master; her transitions are seamless. And I never had trouble figuring out whose picture was being painted. And POW, I was instantly in love with the characters, too. The story centers around a pair of teens who make a baby. The book opens with the baby, Melody, who is now 16, having a birthday party. The mom and dad are there, along with a set of grandparents, and all have a story to tell. Their regrets, passion, ambition, grief. We see how history makes you who you are today, how expectations can get you in trouble, how love sometimes is trumped by ambition and what that can cost a family.

This is just a little taste. A child of denial. Of magical thinking. Of a time when Iris and my father wanted each other in…that way. The something they were so hungry for in each other becoming me. Right in the middle of my glued-to-the-page reading bliss, my pushy book-crazed self shoved me off my pogo stick for a sec so I could go get the scoop on the author and her other books. I just had to know more about her, had to. So I read her bio on Goodreads, which was actually an auto-bio, and I was wowed. So wowed, in fact, that I made a friend listen to me read it over the phone. Yep, I must read everything this storyteller i.

So much fun to have it happen again! Finding a new favorite author is close to nirvana. I have no idea why I started talking about myself in third person. Let me just leave it at this: Read this perfect little book! You might end up joining me on my pogo-stick trip! Thanks to Edelweiss for the advance copy. View all 57 comments. Sep 18, Karen rated it it was amazing. I just loved this! This story is about two urban black families and shifts around in time and is told by the points of view of each of the five characters.

An unplanned teenage pregnancy and how their lives go forward for a young couple, the daughter they bring forth, and the maternal grandparents. I need to read her others. View all 52 comments. Sep 14, Toni rated it it was amazing. Lyrical, poignant, powerful, Red at the bone by Jacqueline Woodson will mesmerize you with its spellbinding tale how people from different origins and backgrounds come together, love, create a new life, stay or go their different ways and continue living. The book begins with a special kind of celebration- it is Melody's sixteenth birthday and her coming of age party. She is wearing a custom made vintage dress, a corset and silk stockings. The dress was sewn and paid for by her maternal grandpare Lyrical, poignant, powerful, Red at the bone by Jacqueline Woodson will mesmerize you with its spellbinding tale how people from different origins and backgrounds come together, love, create a new life, stay or go their different ways and continue living.

The dress was sewn and paid for by her maternal grandparents for her mother Iris who never got her chance to wear it, because by the time she would have, she was already pregnant with Melody. As Melody is dancing in abandon with her friends, she is watched by her family. Her mother is wondering how things got so wrong between them. She is remembering how her own mother reacted to the news of the pregnancy, crying and cursing her daughter's foolishness that destroyed the bright future her parents had been hoping for. Aubrey, Melody's father, was just a teenager himself.

He remembers falling in love with Iris and discovering 'what love felt like- a constant ache, an endless need'. He remembers his own mother who was so light-skinned, she could be mistaken for a white woman. People even asked her if Aubrey was her foster child. They were very poor, but it took years for Aubrey even realize that, let alone feel any kind shame for their poverty. Above all, Aubrey remembers his mother's words:-'I believe in you, Aubrey. My love. My life. My light.

She grew up with a special kind of philosophy geared towards survival. Her grandfather's lifestory is perhaps much simple, but it is all about love and family. As we follow the protagonists' stories, we learn more and more about Melody's family, the love they all give her, their sincerity, and their own search for identity. Starting from Aubrey's mother explanation for their very different looks- 'The black ancestors beat the crap out of the white ones and said, Let this baby on through- through Aubrey's mother helping pregnant Iris re-kindle her ambition and passion for learning in order to finish her high school and go on to college to Sabe's inner voice 'Rise.

Rise' refusing to let gossips dictate how she and her family should live. Jacqueline Woodson's writing is exquisitely beautiful and I can see myself reding and re-reading this book again and again. Each character has a unique voice and a unique story to tell. Red at the Bone is a little gem of a book that you will keep thinking about long after you have turned the last page. View all 5 comments. Sep 30, Jenna rated it liked it Shelves: fiction. First off, let me say that Jacqueline Woodson writes exquisitely! Reading her words is like being enveloped in a song. I wanted to love this book, oh how I wanted to love it! Instead, I had a hard time connecting, even whilst I loved reading the words.

I think the reason for this is that there are so many narrators and at times I got confused as to who was speaking. I really didn't connect with any of the characters except for Iris. Had the book been written in her voice alone, I think this woul First off, let me say that Jacqueline Woodson writes exquisitely! Had the book been written in her voice alone, I think this would have been a 5 star read for me. Even had it been written in two voices, I think I would have loved it. Let us be clear'd Of being tyrannous, since we so openly Proceed in justice, which shall have due course, Even to the guilt or the purgation.

Produce the prisoner. Officer It is his highness' pleasure that the queen Appear in person here in court. Mariner Ay, my lord: and fear We have landed in ill time: the skies look grimly And threaten present blusters. In my conscience, The heavens with that we have in hand are angry And frown upon 's. Go, get aboard; Look to thy bark: I'll not be long before I call upon thee. Mariner Make your best haste, and go not Too far i' the land: 'tis like to be loud weather; Besides, this place is famous for the creatures Of prey that keep upon't. Mariner I am glad at heart To be so rid o' the business.

Besides, the penitent king, my master, hath sent for me; to whose feeling sorrows I might be some allay, or I o'erween to think so, which is another spur to my departure. POLIXENES As thou lovest me, Camillo, wipe not out the rest of thy services by leaving me now: the need I have of thee thine own goodness hath made; better not to have had thee than thus to want thee: thou, having made me businesses which none without thee can sufficiently manage, must either stay to execute them thyself or take away with thee the very services thou hast done; which if I have not enough considered, as too much I cannot, to be more thankful to thee shall be my study, and my profit therein the heaping friendships.

Of that fatal country, Sicilia, prithee speak no more; whose very naming punishes me with the remembrance of that penitent, as thou callest him, and reconciled king, my brother; whose loss of his most precious queen and children are even now to be afresh lamented. Say to me, when sawest thou the Prince Florizel, my son? Kings are no less unhappy, their issue not being gracious, than they are in losing them when they have approved their virtues. What his happier affairs may be, are to me unknown: but I have missingly noted, he is of late much retired from court and is less frequent to his princely exercises than formerly he hath appeared.

POLIXENES I have considered so much, Camillo, and with some care; so far that I have eyes under my service which look upon his removedness; from whom I have this intelligence, that he is seldom from the house of a most homely shepherd; a man, they say, that from very nothing, and beyond the imagination of his neighbours, is grown into an unspeakable estate. CAMILLO I have heard, sir, of such a man, who hath a daughter of most rare note: the report of her is extended more than can be thought to begin from such a cottage.

Thou shalt accompany us to the place; where we will, not appearing what we are, have some question with the shepherd; from whose simplicity I think it not uneasy to get the cause of my son's resort thither. Prithee, be my present partner in this business, and lay aside the thoughts of Sicilia. We must disguise ourselves. The white sheet bleaching on the hedge, With heigh! Doth set my pugging tooth on edge; For a quart of ale is a dish for a king. The lark, that tirra-lyra chants, With heigh! I have served Prince Florizel and in my time wore three-pile; but now I am out of service: But shall I go mourn for that, my dear?

The pale moon shines by night: And when I wander here and there, I then do most go right. If tinkers may have leave to live, And bear the sow-skin budget, Then my account I well may, give, And in the stocks avouch it. My traffic is sheets; when the kite builds, look to lesser linen. My father named me Autolycus; who being, as I am, littered under Mercury, was likewise a snapper-up of unconsidered trifles. With die and drab I purchased this caparison, and my revenue is the silly cheat. Gallows and knock are too powerful on the highway: beating and hanging are terrors to me: for the life to come, I sleep out the thought of it. A prize! Enter Clown. This your sheep-shearing Is as a meeting of the petty gods, And you the queen on't.

Your high self, The gracious mark o' the land, you have obscured With a swain's wearing, and me, poor lowly maid, Most goddess-like prank'd up: but that our feasts In every mess have folly and the feeders Digest it with a custom, I should blush To see you so attired, sworn, I think, To show myself a glass. To me the difference forges dread; your greatness Hath not been used to fear. Even now I tremble To think your father, by some accident, Should pass this way as you did: O, the Fates! How would he look, to see his work so noble Vilely bound up? What would he say? Or how Should I, in these my borrow'd flaunts, behold The sternness of his presence?

The gods themselves, Humbling their deities to love, have taken The shapes of beasts upon them: Jupiter Became a bull, and bellow'd; the green Neptune A ram, and bleated; and the fire-robed god, Golden Apollo, a poor humble swain, As I seem now. Their transformations Were never for a piece of beauty rarer, Nor in a way so chaste, since my desires Run not before mine honour, nor my lusts Burn hotter than my faith. Or I'll be thine, my fair, Or not my father's.

For I cannot be Mine own, nor any thing to any, if I be not thine. To this I am most constant, Though destiny say no. Be merry, gentle; Strangle such thoughts as these with any thing That you behold the while.

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