Marleys Ghost A Christmas Carol

Monday, January 3, 2022 1:11:49 AM

Marleys Ghost A Christmas Carol



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A Christmas Carol (2009) Marley's Ghost HD 1080p Part 1

Somehow he gets thoughtful, sitting by himself so much, and thinks the strangest things you ever heard. He told me, coming home, that he hoped the people saw him in the church, because he was a cripple, and it might be pleasant to them to remember, upon Christmas day, who made lame beggars walk and blind men see. Bob's voice was tremulous when he told them this, and trembled more when he said that Tiny Tim was growing strong and hearty. His active little crutch was heard upon the floor, and back came Tiny Tim before another word was spoken, escorted by his brother and sister to his stool beside the fire; and while Bob, turning up his cuffs, -- as if, poor fellow, they were capable of being made more shabby, -- compounded some hot mixture in a jug with gin and lemons, and stirred it round and round and put it on the hob to simmer, Master Peter and the two ubiquitous young Cratchits went to fetch the goose , with which they soon returned in high procession.

Mrs Cratchit made the gravy ready beforehand in a little saucepan hissing hot; Master Peter mashed the potatoes with incredible vigor; Miss Belinda sweetened up the apple-sauce; Martha dusted the hot plates; Bob took Tiny Tim beside him in a tiny corner at the table; the two young Cratchits set chairs for everybody, not forgetting themselves, and mounting guard upon their posts, crammed spoons into their mouths, lest they should shriek for goose before their turn came to be helped. At last the dishes were set on, and grace was said. It was succeeded by a breathless pause, as Mrs Cratchit, looking slowly all along the carving-knife, prepared to plunge it in the breast; but when she did, and when the long-expected gush of stuffing issued forth, one murmur of delight arose all round the board, and even Tiny Tim, excited by the two young Cratchits, beat on the table with the handle of his knife, and feebly cried, Hurrah!

There never was such a goose. Bob said he didn't believe there ever was such a goose cooked. Its tenderness and flavor, size and cheapness, were the themes of universal admiration. Eked out by apple-sauce and mashed potatoes, it was a sufficient dinner for the whole family; indeed, as Mrs Cratchit said with great delight surveying one small atom of a bone upon the dish , they hadn't ate it all at last! Yet every one had had enough, and the youngest Cratchits in particular were steeped in sage and onion to the eyebrows! But now, the plates being changed by Miss Belinda, Mrs Cratchit left the room alone, -- too nervous to bear witnesses, -- to take the pudding up, and bring it in. Suppose it should not be done enough! Suppose it should break in turning out!

Suppose somebody should have got over the wall of the back yard, and stolen it, while they were merry with the goose, -- a supposition at which the two young Cratchits became livid! All sorts of horrors were supposed. A great deal of steam! The pudding was out of the copper. A smell like a washing-day! That was the cloth. A smell like an eating-house and a pastry-cook's next door to each other with a laundress's next door to that!

That was the pudding! In half a minute Mrs Cratchit entered, -- flushed but smiling proudly, -- with the pudding, like a speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half a quartern of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top. O, a wonderful pudding I Bob Cratchit said, and calmly too, that he regarded it as the greatest success achieved by Mrs Cratchit since their marriage. Mrs Cratchit said that now the weight was off her mind, she would confess she had had her doubts about the quantity of flour. Everybody had something to say about it, but nobody said or thought it was at all a small pudding for a large family. Any Cratchit would have blushed to hint at such a thing. At last the dinner was all done, the cloth was cleared, the hearth swept, and the fire made up.

The compound in the jug being tasted, and considered perfect, apples and oranges were put upon the table, and a shovelful of chestnuts on the fire. Then all the Cratchit family drew round the hearth, in what Bob Cratchit called a circle, and at Bob Cratchit's elbow stood the family display of glass, -- two tumblers, and a custard-cup without a handle. These held the hot stuff from the jug, however, as well as golden goblets would have done; and Bob served it out with beaming looks, while the chestnuts on the fire sputtered and crackled noisily. Then Bob proposed: He sat very close to his father's side, upon his little stool. Bob held his withered little hand in his, as if he loved the child, and wished to keep him by his side, and dreaded that he might be taken from him.

You know he is, Robert! Nobody knows it better than you do, poor fellow! Long life to him! A merry Christmas and a happy New Year! He'll be very merry and very happy, I have no doubt! The children drank the toast after her. It was the first of their proceedings which had no heartiness in it. Tiny Tim drank it last of all, but he didn't care twopence for it. Scrooge was the ogre of the family.

The mention of his name cast a dark shadow on the party, which was not dispelled for full five minutes. After it had passed away, they were ten times merrier than before, from the mere relief of Scrooge the Baleful being done with. Bob Cratchit told them how he had a situation in his eye for Master Peter, which would bring in, if obtained, full five and sixpence weekly. The two young Cratchits laughed tremendously at the idea of Peter's being a man of business; and Peter himself looked thoughtfully at the fire from between his collars, as if he were deliberating what particular investments he should favor when he came into the receipt of that bewildering income.

Martha, who was a poor apprentice at a milliner's , then told them what kind of work she had to do, and how many hours she worked at a stretch, and how she meant to lie abed to-morrow morning for a good long rest; to-morrow being a holiday she passed at home. Also how she had seen a countess and a lord some days before, and how the lord "was much about as tall as Peter"; at which Peter pulled up his collars so high that you couldn't have seen his head if you had been there.

All this time the chestnuts and the jug went round and round; and by and by they had a song, about a lost child travelling in the snow, from Tiny Tim, who had a plaintive little voice, and sang it very well indeed. There was nothing of high mark in this. They were not a handsome family; they were not well dressed; their shoes were far from being water proof; their clothes were scanty; and Peter might have known, and very likely did, the inside of a pawnbroker's. But they were happy, grateful, pleased with one another, and contented with the time; and when they faded, and looked happier yet in the bright sprinklings of the Spirit's torch at parting, Scrooge had his eye upon them, and especially on Tiny Tim, until the last.

It was a great surprise to Scrooge, as this scene vanished, to hear a hearty laugh. It was a much greater surprise to Scrooge to recognize it as his own nephew's, and to find himself in a bright, dry, gleaming room, with the Spirit standing smiling by his side, and looking at that same nephew. It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good-humor. When Scrooge's nephew laughed, Scrooge's niece by marriage laughed as heartily as he. And their assembled friends, being not a bit behindhand, laughed out lustily. Bless those women! They are always in earnest. She was very pretty; exceedingly pretty.

With a dimpled, surprised-looking, capital face; a ripe little mouth that seemed made to be kissed, -- as no doubt it was; all kinds of good little dots about her chin, that melted into one another when she laughed; and the sunniest pair of eyes you ever saw in any little creature's head. Altogether she was what you would have called provoking, but satisfactory, too. O, perfectly satisfactory.

However, his offences carry their own punishment, and I have nothing to say against him. Who suffers by his ill whims? Himself, always. Here he takes it into his head to dislike us, and he won't come and dine with us. What's the consequence? He don't lose much of a dinner. Everybody else said the same, and they must be allowed to have been competent judges, because they had just had dinner; and, with the dessert upon the table, were clustered round the fire, by lamplight. What do you say, Topper? Topper clearly had his eye on one of Scrooge's niece's sisters, for he answered that a bachelor was a wretched outcast, who had no right to express an opinion on the subject. Whereat Scrooges niece's sister -- the plump one with the lace tucker; not the one with the roses -- blushed.

After tea they had some music. For they were a musical family, and knew what they were about, when they sung a Glee or Catch, I can assure you, -- especially Topper, who could growl away in the bass like a good one, and never swell the large veins in his forehead, or get red in the face over it. But they didn't devote the whole evening to music. After a while they played at forfeits; for it is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was a child himself: There was first a game at blind-man's-buff though.

And I no more believe Topper was really blinded than I believe he had eyes in his boots. Because the way in which he went after that plump sister in the lace tucker was an outrage on the credulity of human nature. Knocking down the fire-irons, tumbling over the, chairs, bumping up against the piano, smothering himself among the curtains, wherever she went there went he! He always knew where the plump sister was. He wouldn't catch anybody else. If you had fallen up against him, as some of them did, and stood there, he would have made a feint of endeavoring to seize you, which would have been an reply to affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.

It was a Game called Yes and No, where Scrooge's nephew had to think of something, and the rest must find out what; he only answering to their questions yes or no, as the case was. The fire of questioning to which he was exposed elicited from him that he was thinking of an animal, a live animal, rather a disagreeable animal, a savage animal, an animal that growled and grunted sometimes, and talked sometimes, and lived in London, and walked about the streets, and wasn't made a show of, and wasn't led by anybody, and didn't live in a menagerie , and was never killed in a market, and was not a horse, or an ass, or a cow, or a bull, or a tiger, or a dog, or a pig, or a cat, or a bear.

At every new question put to him, this nephew burst into a fresh roar of laughter; and was so inexpressibly tickled, that he was obliged to get up off the sofa and stamp. At last the plump sister cried out: Which it certainly was. Admiration was the sentiment, though some objected that the reply to "Is it a bear? Uncle Scrooge had imperceptibly become so gay and light of heart, that he would have drank to the unconscious company in an inaudible speech. But the whole scene passed off in the breath of the last word spoken by his nephew; and he and the Spirit were again upon their travels.

Much they saw, and far they went, and many homes they visited, but always with a happy end. The Spirit stood beside sick-beds, and they were cheerful; on foreign lands, and they were close at home; by struggling men, and they were patient in their greater hope; by poverty, and it was rich. In almshouse, hospital, and jail, in misery's every refuge, where vain man in his little brief authority had not made fast the door, and barred the Spirit out, he left his blessing, and taught Scrooge his precepts. Suddenly, as they stood together in an open place, the bell struck twelve. Scrooge looked about him for the Ghost, and saw it no more. As the last stroke ceased to vibrate, he remembered the prediction of old Jacob Marley, and, lifting up his eyes, beheld a solemn Phantom, draped and hooded, coming like a mist along the ground towards him.

THE Phantom slowly, gravely, silently approached. When it came near him, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the air through which this Spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery. It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand. He knew no more, for the Spirit neither spoke nor moved. Ghost of the Future! I fear you more than any spectre I have seen. But as I know your purpose is to do me good, and as I hope to live to be another man from what I was, I am prepared to bear you company, and do it with a thankful heart. Will you not speak to me? Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know.

Lead on, Spirit! They scarcely seemed to enter the city; for the city rather seemed to spring up about them. But there they were in the heart of it; on 'Change, amongst the merchants. The Spirit stopped beside one little knot of business men. Observing that the hand was pointed to them, Scrooge advanced to listen to their talk. I only know he's dead. He hasn't left it to me. That's all I know. Bye, bye! Scrooge was at first inclined to be surprised that the Spirit should attach importance to conversation apparently so trivial; but feeling assured that it must have some hidden purpose, he set himself to consider what it was likely to be. It could scarcely be supposed to have any bearing on the death of Jacob, his old partner, for that was Past, and this Ghost's province was the Future.

He looked about in that very place for his own image; but another man stood in his accustomed corner, and though the clock pointed to his usual time of day for being there, he saw no likeness of himself among the multitudes that poured in through the Porch. It gave him little surprise, however; for he had been revolving in his mind a change of life, and he thought and hoped he saw his new-born resolutions carried out in this. They left this busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, to a low shop where iron, old rags, bottles, bones, and greasy offal were bought. A gray-haired rascal, of great age, sat smoking his pipe.

Scrooge and the Phantom came into the presence of this man, just as a woman with a heavy bundle slunk into the shop. But she had scarcely entered, when another woman, similarly laden, came in too; and she was closely followed by a man in faded black. After a short period of blank astonishment, in which the old man with the pipe had joined them, they all three burst into a laugh. Look here, old Joe, here's a chance! If we haven't all three met here without meaning it! You were made free of it long ago, you know; and the other two ain't strangers. What have you got to sell? What odds, Mrs Dilber? He always did! Who's the worse for the loss of a few things like these? Not a dead man, I suppose.

Mrs Dilber, whose manner was remarkable for general propitiation, said, "No, indeed, ma'am. If he had been, he'd have had somebody to look after him when he was struck with Death, instead of lying gasping out his last there, alone by himself. Open that bundle, old Joe, and let me know the value of it. Speak out plain. I'm not afraid to be the first, nor afraid for them to see it. Joe went down on his knees for the greater convenience of opening the bundle, and dragged out a large and heavy roll of some dark stuff. He isn't likely to take cold without 'em. I dare say.

You may look through that shirt till your eyes ache; but you won't find a hole in it, nor a threadbare place. It's the best he had, and a fine one too. They'd have wasted it by dressing him up in it, if it hadn't been for me. I see, I see. The case of this unhappy man might be my own. My life tends that way, now. Merciful Heaven, what is this! The scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bare, uncurtained bed. A pale light, rising in the outer air, fell straight upon this bed; and on it, unwatched, unwept, uncared for, was the body of this plundered unknown man.

The Ghost conducted him to poor Bob Cratchit's house, -- the dwelling he had visited before, -- and found the mother and the children seated round the fire. Very quiet. The noisy little Cratchits were as still as statues in one corner, and sat looking up at Peter, who had a book before him. The mother and her daughters were engaged in needle-work. But surely they were very quiet! Where had Scrooge heard those words? He had not dreamed them. The boy must have read them. Why did he not go on? It makes them weak by candle-light; and I wouldn't show weak eyes to your father when he comes home, for the world. It must be near his time. And there is your father at the door! She hurried out to meet him; and little Bob in his comforter -- he had need of it, poor fellow -- came in.

His tea was ready for him on the hob, and they all tried who should help him to it most. Then the two young Cratchits got upon his knees and laid, each child, a little cheek against his face, as if they said, "Don't mind it, father. Don't be grieved! Bob was very cheerful with them, and spoke pleasantly to all the family. He looked at the work upon the table, and praised the industry and speed of Mrs Cratchit and the girls. Soundtracks Hark! User reviews 98 Review. Top review. One of the Most Beautiful Christmas Tales. He runs his business exploiting his employee Bob Cratchit Gene Lockhart and spends unfriendly treatment to his nephew Fred Barry MacKay and acquaintances.

Carroll , who died seven years ago and tells him that three spirits would visit him that night. Scrooge finds that life is good and finds redemption changing thoughts about Christmas, Bob, tiny Tim, his nephew and people in general. I do not recall how many adaptations of one of the most known Charles Dickens' short story I have seen but this is also wonderful. I do not have much more to say but recommend this magnificent family entertainment. My vote is eight. FAQ What is 'A Christmas Carol' about? Is "A Christmas Carol" based on a book? Why does everyone address each other as "governor"?

Details Edit. Release date December 16, United States. United States. Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios - W. Washington Blvd. Technical specs Edit. Runtime 1h 9min. Black and White. Related news. Nov 7 Trailers from Hell. Jun 24 Cinemaretro. Contribute to this page Suggest an edit or add missing content. The Oxford Movement of the s and s had produced a resurgence of the traditional rituals and religious observances associated with Christmastide and, with A Christmas Carol , Dickens captured the zeitgeist while he reflected and reinforced his vision of Christmas.

Dickens advocated a humanitarian focus of the holiday, [] which influenced several aspects of Christmas that are still celebrated in Western culture, such as family gatherings, seasonal food and drink, dancing, games and a festive generosity of spirit. The novelist William Dean Howells , analysing several of Dickens's Christmas stories, including A Christmas Carol , considered that by the "pathos appears false and strained; the humor largely horseplay; the characters theatrical; the joviality pumped; the psychology commonplace; the sociology alone funny".

Ruth Glancy, a professor of English literature, states that the largest impact of A Christmas Carol was the influence felt by individual readers. Chesterton wrote "The beauty and blessing of the story Whether the Christmas visions would or would not convert Scrooge, they convert us. Davis, analysing the changes made to adaptations over time, sees changes to the focus of the story and its characters to reflect mainstream thinking of the period. While Dickens's Victorian audiences would have viewed the tale as a spiritual but secular parable, in the early 20th century it became a children's story, read by parents who remembered their parents reading it when they were younger.

In the lead-up to, and during, the Great Depression , Davis identifies that while some see the story as a "denunciation of capitalism, British-made films showed a traditional telling of the story, while US-made works showed Cratchit in a more central role, escaping the depression caused by European bankers and celebrating what Davis calls "the Christmas of the common man". By the s he was again set in a world of depression and economic uncertainty. Literature portal Novels portal. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see A Christmas Carol disambiguation. Main article: Adaptations of A Christmas Carol. Play media. Dickens was carried away by exuberance, and momentarily forgot good taste".

Chesterton wrote of Dickens's religious views that "the tone of Dickens towards religion, though like that of most of his contemporaries, philosophically disturbed and rather historically ignorant, had an element that was very characteristic of himself. He had all the prejudices of his time. He had, for instance, that dislike of defined dogmas, which really means a preference for unexamined dogmas. It was purchased by J. In Britain the tradition had been to eat roast goose, but a change to turkey followed the publication of the book.

By Mrs Beeton , in her Book of Household Management , advised her readers that "A Christmas dinner, with the middle-class of this empire, would scarcely be a Christmas dinner without its turkey. Ackroyd, Peter London: Sinclair-Stevenson. ISBN Billen, Andrew London: Short Books. Callow, Simon Dickens' Christmas: A Victorian Celebration. London: Frances Lincoln. Carlyle, Thomas London: J. OCLC Chesterton, G. The Collected Works of G. Chesterton: Chesterton on Dickens. Childs, Peter; Tredell, Nicolas Charles Dickens. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan. Cochrane, Robertson Wordplay: origins, meanings, and usage of the English language.

Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Davis, Paul a. The Lives and Times of Ebenezer Scrooge. Deacy, Christopher Oxford: Oxford University Press. DeVito, Carlo Inventing Scrooge Kindle ed. Dickens, Charles London: Chapman and Hall. Diedrick, James In Thesing, William ed. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale. Douglas-Fairhurst, Robert In Dickens, Charles ed. A Christmas Carol and other Christmas Books. Forbes, Bruce David Christmas: A Candid History.

Garry, Jane; El Shamy, Hasan Archetypes and Motifs in Folklore and Literature. Armonk, NY: M. Glancy, Ruth F. Michigan: Garland. Hammond, R. Harrison, Mary-Catherine Ann Arbor, MI. Howells, William Dean My literary passions, criticism and fiction. Hutton, Ronald Jordan, Christine Secret Gloucester. Stroud, Glos: Amberley Publishing. Jordan, John O. The Cambridge Companion to Charles Dickens. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kelly, Richard Michael Ontario: Broadway Press. Ledger, Sally Dickens and the Popular Radical Imagination. Moore, Grace Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Restad, Penne L. Christmas in America: a History. Sillence, Rebecca Gloucester History Tour. Slater, Michael A Christmas Carol and other Christmas Writings. London: Penguin Books. Standiford, Les New York: Crown. Tomalin, Claire

Marley really makes things clear for Scrooge. Marleys ghost a christmas carol cast Edit. Theme Of Allusions In Fahrenheit 451 A Rhetorical Analysis Of Abraham Lincolns Powerful Speech visits, Scrooge Ang Buhay Ng Isang Bayani Analysis transformed into a kinder, gentler Black Boy Chapter 19 Analysis. It shall not be repeated.