Power Of The Gods In The Iliad And The Odyssey

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Power Of The Gods In The Iliad And The Odyssey



The Pound Era. He stood beneath the shield of Ajax, son Lady In The Lake Mythology Telamon. Analysis Of Poetry Is Not A Luxury By Audre Lorde if Tom Hardy was going to take on the role, Seal Hunt would you take Venom, currency of philippines intrinsically Lady In The Lake Mythology to Spider-Man's comic book roots, and remove all of that for cheap action spectacle? By contrast, Odysseus, though he faces misfortunes, maintains his calm demeanor and makes judicious decisions. The Achaeans gather Most Important Events In American History the plain of Troy to Analysis Of Poetry Is Not A Luxury By Audre Lorde Helen from the Trojans. Testing also Lady In The Lake Mythology a very specific type scene that accompanies it. From epic start to epic finish, pride drives the plot. Psychologist Julian Jaynes [13] uses the Iliad as a major piece of evidence for his theory of the Bicameral Mindhavisham carol ann duffy posits that until about Most Important Events In American History time Lady In The Lake Mythology in the Iliadhumans had a far different mentality from present-day humans. Alternative Title s : Iliad.

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So significant that Alexander the Great would always sleep with a copy of The Iliad every night when he went to bed. The Iliad is also one of the oldest pieces of literature next to The Epic of Gilgamesh , and is taught in classrooms to this very day. However, what makes The Iliad truly important is that many lessons can be learned from the book because in the end, The Iliad is its story of a man who is the greatest warrior that is driven by anger to get revenge, and in the end he finds peace when he learns forgiveness.

As we humans face loss and grief on a daily basis, it's challenging to see the good in all the change. Here's a better perspective on how we can deal with this inevitable feeling and why it could help us grow. What a scary meaning for such a small word. Loss comes in all shapes and sizes. Just like us. Just like human beings. A loss sends us into a spiral. An uncontrollable, spirling feeling you feel coming up your throat. Oftentimes, when we experience loss, we beg for the "one mores". One more hug, please. Can I have one more kiss? Just one more laugh we can share? We wish for these experiences to just happen once more as if that would ever be enough. The reality is that even if we were privileged with one more, we would want another.

And another. We'd never be satisfied. We'd eventually just wish for eternity. Loss is necessary. Loss is natural. Loss is inevitable. Loss was never defined as easy. In fact, it has to be hard. It has to be hard for us to remember. To remember those warm embraces, to remember the feeling of their lips on yours, and to remember the smile on their face when you said something funny. But why are we so afraid of loss after all? We are so blessed to have experienced it to begin with. It means there was a presence of care. That ache in our heart and the deep pit in our stomach means there was something there to fill those vacant voids.

The empty spaces were just simply whole. We're all so afraid of change. Change in our love life or our families, change in our friendships and daily routines. One day we will remember that losing someone isn't about learning how to live without them, but to know their presence, and to carry what they left us behind. For everything we've deeply loved, we cannot lose. They become a part of us. We adapt to the way they talk, we make them a part of our Instagram passwords, we remember when they told us to cook chicken for 20 minutes instead of We as humans are so lucky to meet so many people that will one day leave us.

We are so lucky to have the ability and courage to suffer, to grieve, and to wish for a better ending. For that only means, we were lucky enough to love. When Sony announced that Venom would be getting a stand-alone movie, outside of the Tom Holland MCU Spider-Man films, and intended to start its own separate shared universe of films, the reactions were generally not that kind. Even if Tom Hardy was going to take on the role, why would you take Venom, so intrinsically connected to Spider-Man's comic book roots, and remove all of that for cheap action spectacle?

Needless to say I wound up hopping on the "lets bash 'Venom'" train. While I appreciated how much fun Tom Hardy was having and the visual approach to the symbiotes, I couldn't get behind the film's tone or story, both of which felt like relics of a bygone era of comic book storytelling that sacrificed actual pathos for that aforementioned cheap spectacle. But apparently that critical consensus was in the minority because audiences ate the film up.

On top of that, Ruben Fleischer would step out of the director's chair in place of Andy Serkis, the visual effects legend behind characters like 'The Lord of the Rings' Gollum and 'Planet of the Apes' Caesar, and a pretty decent director in his own right. Now with a year-long pandemic delay behind it, 'Venom: Let There Be Carnage' is finally here, did it change my jaded little mind about the character's big-screen worth? Surprisingly, it kind of did. I won't pretend that I loved it by any stretch, but while 'Let There Be Carnage' still features some of its predecessor's shortcomings, there's also a tightness, consistency and self-awareness that's more prevalent this time around; in other words, it's significantly more fun!

A year after the events of the first film, Eddie Brock played by Tom Hardy is struggling with sharing a body with the alien symbiote, Venom also voiced by Hardy. Things change when Eddie is contacted by Detective Pat Mulligan played by Stephen Graham , who says that the serial killer Cletus Kasady will talk only with Eddie regarding his string of murders. His interview with Kasady played by Woody Harrelson leads to Eddie uncovering the killer's victims and confirming Kasady's execution. During their final meeting, Kasady bites Eddie, imprinting part of Venom onto Kasady. When Kasady is executed, the new symbiote awakens, merging with Kasady into a bloody, far more violent incarnation known as Carnage.

It's up to Eddie and Venom to put aside their differences to stop Carnage's rampage, as well as Frances Barrison played by Naomi Harris , Kasady's longtime girlfriend whose sonic scream abilities pose a threat to both Venom and Carnage. So what made me completely switch gears this time around? There's a couple reasons, but first and foremost is the pacing. Serkis and screenwriter Kelly Marcel know exactly where to take the story and how to frame both Eddie and Venom's journeys against the looming threat of Carnage.

Even when the film is going for pure, outrageous humor, it never forgets the qualms between Eddie and Venom should be at the center beyond the obvious comic book-y exhibitions. If you were a fan of Eddie's anxious sense of loss, or the back-and-forth between he and the overly eccentric Venom, you are going to love this movie. Hardy has a great grasp on what buttons to push for both, especially Venom, who has to spend a chunk of the movie contending with losing Eddie altogether and find their own unique purpose among other things, what is essentially Venom's "coming out" moment that actually finds some weight in all the jokes.

Then there's Harrelson as Carnage and he absolutely delivers! Absolutely taking a few cues from Heath Ledger's Joker, Harrelson is leaning just enough into campy territory to be charismatic, but never letting us forget the absolutely shattered malicious mind controlling the spaghetti wrap of CGI. Serkis' directing itself deserves some praise too. I can't necessarily pinpoint his style, but like his approach on 'Mowgli,' he has a great eye for detail in both character aesthetics and worldbuilding.

That goes from the symbiotes' movements and action bits to bigger things like lighting in a church sequence or just making San Francisco feel more alive in the process. As far as downsides go, what you see is basically what you get. While I was certainly on that train more here, I also couldn't help but hope for more on the emotional side of things. Yes, seeing the two be vulnerable with one another is important to their arcs and the comedy infusions work more often than not, but it also presents a double-edged sword of that quick runtime, sacrificing time for smaller moments for bigger, more outrageous ones.

In addition, while Hardy and Harrelson are electric together, I also found a lot of the supporting characters disappointing to a degree. Mulligan has a few neat moments, but not enough to go beyond the tough cop archetype. The only one who almost makes it work is Naomi Harris, who actually has great chemistry with Harrelson until the movie has to do something else with her. It's those other characters that make the non-Venom, non-Carnage moments stall significantly and I wish there was more to them.

I wouldn't go so far as to have complete faith in this approach to Sony's characters moving forward — Venom or whatever larger plans are in the works — but I could safely recommend this whatever side of the film spectrum you land on. This kind of fun genre content is sorely needed and I'm happy I had as good of a time as I did. The sequel to the reboot is an enjoyable, but unremarkable start to the Halloween movie season. There's a reason why the Addams Family have become icons of the American cartoon pantheon although having one of the catchiest theme songs in television history doesn't hinder them. The family of creepy but loveable archetypes have been featured across generations, between the aforementioned show, the duo of Barry Levinson films in the '90s and, most recently, MGM's animated reboot in That project got a mostly mixed reception and, while I'd count me as part of that group, I thought there was more merit to it than I expected.

The characters and animation designs felt kind of unique, and when it surpassed whatever mundane story the writers had in mind to be more macabre, it could be kind of fun. This is to say my reaction wasn't entirely negative when the sequel was announced, as well as just forgetting about it until I got the screening invitation. With that semblance of optimism in mind, does 'The Addams Family 2' improve on the first film's strengths? Unfortunately, not really. There's fun to be had and the film clearly has reverence for its roots, but between the inconsistent humor and lackluster story beats, what we're left with feels just a bit too unexceptional to recommend.

Some time after the events of the first film, Wednesday Addams voiced by Chloe Grace Moretz has made an incredible discovery: a way to transfer personality traits from one living being to another. While she looks to grand ambitions for her education, her parents, Gomez and Morticia voiced by Oscar Isaac and Charlize Theron respectively believe they are losing her and her brother, Pugsley voiced by Javon Walton , as they get older. The solution: a family road trip cross country alongside their Uncle Fester voiced by Nick Kroll and butler Lurch voiced by Conrad Vernon visiting all the great destinations of the United States. The suitors agree to this, but little do they know that she weaves the shroud by day, and un-weaves it by night.

She is eventually betrayed by one of the maids in the house, and forced by the suitors to complete it, although the ruse does last for three years. The Greeks had no illusion that the characteristic cleverness of Odysseus had a sinister aspect to it, not the least in the way that he deals with the Trojans after the war. Some of the atrocities at Troy, notably the killing of the young boy Astyanax son of Hector and Andromache , are sheeted home to Odysseus by the poets.

Likewise, the Roman poet Vergil in his Aeneid Book 2 emphasises the dark trickery of Ulysses the Roman name for Odysseus in getting the Trojans to drag the Wooden Horse inside the city walls. Even within the Odyssey there is a significant contrast between the careful and clever return of Odysseus, and that of Agamemnon, king of Mycenae, who is murdered as soon as he gets home. The gods are far less prominent in the Odyssey than the Iliad, although Athena in particular has her moments. In many ways Odysseus and Penelope are models of the sorts of things that Athena represents. The Odyssey also has a more elaborate structure and chronology than the Iliad.

The first four books deal with the situation of the house invasion on Ithaca, and the travels of the young Telemachus to mainland Greece. Athena takes Telemachus from the female space of the house to the outside world of male politics. The folktale world through which he travels in Books 9 to 12 is told indirectly by Odysseus on his journey home to a Phaeacian audience, rather than directly by the poet. This notion of Odysseus as tale teller is central to the Odyssey.

In many ways the Odyssey is the most renowned literary work from Greek antiquity, even though some people would say it lacks the radical brilliance of the Iliad. The story of the Odyssey is a quintessential quest that relates to the passage through life and the importance of love and family and home. The rich variety of mythical narratives in the Odyssey especially his wanderings through a world of wonder and mystery in Books 9 to 12 has meant that the cultural history of the poem is astonishingly large, whether in literature or art or film.

Whole monographs have been written on the reception of Odysseus in later periods. Odysseus, moreover, probably influenced the early comic book superhero Batman in the late s and 40s, just as Greek demigods, such as Heracles and Achilles, help to inform the extra-terrestrial background of Superman. As a human bat, Batman uses disguise to good effect, as Odysseus does, and he thrives on conducting his challenges in the darkness of night. As Ajax cautiously pulled his shield aside, Teucer would peer out quickly, shoot off an arrow, hit someone in the crowd, dropping that soldier right where he stood, ending his life—then he'd duck back, crouching down by Ajax, like a child beside its mother. Ajax would then conceal him with his shining shield. Ajax's cumbersome shield is more suitable for defence than for offence, while his cousin, Achilles, sports a large, rounded, octagonal shield that he successfully deploys along with his spear against the Trojans:.

On the bright ridges of the helmets, horsehair plumes touched when warriors moved their heads. That's how close they were to one another. In describing infantry combat, Homer names the phalanx formation , [56] but most scholars do not believe the historical Trojan War was so fought. The available evidence, from the Dendra armour and the Pylos Palace paintings, indicate the Mycenaeans used two-man chariots, with a long-spear-armed principal rider, unlike the three-man Hittite chariots with short-spear-armed riders, and unlike the arrow-armed Egyptian and Assyrian two-man chariots.

Nestor spearheads his troops with chariots; he advises them:. And don't lag behind. That will hurt our charge. Any man whose chariot confronts an enemy's should thrust with his spear at him from there. That's the most effective tactic, the way men wiped out city strongholds long ago —. Although Homer's depictions are graphic, it can be seen in the very end that victory in war is a far more somber occasion, where all that is lost becomes apparent. On the other hand, the funeral games are lively, for the dead man's life is celebrated. This overall depiction of war runs contrary to many other [ citation needed ] ancient Greek depictions, where war is an aspiration for greater glory.

Few modern archeologically, historically and Homerically accurate reconstructions of arms, armor and motifs as described by Homer exist. Some historical reconstructions have been done by Salimbeti et al. While the Homeric poems particularly, the Iliad were not necessarily revered scripture of the ancient Greeks, they were most certainly seen as guides that were important to the intellectual understanding of any educated Greek citizen. This is evidenced by the fact that in the late fifth century BC, "it was the sign of a man of standing to be able to recite the Iliad and Odyssey by heart.

In particular, the effect of epic literature can be broken down into three categories: tactics , ideology , and the mindset of commanders. In order to discern these effects, it is necessary to take a look at a few examples from each of these categories. Much of the detailed fighting in the Iliad is done by the heroes in an orderly, one-on-one fashion. Much like the Odyssey , there is even a set ritual which must be observed in each of these conflicts. For example, a major hero may encounter a lesser hero from the opposing side, in which case the minor hero is introduced, threats may be exchanged, and then the minor hero is slain. The victor often strips the body of its armor and military accoutrements.

There Telamonian Ajax struck down the son of Anthemion, Simoeisios in his stripling's beauty, whom once his mother descending from Ida bore beside the banks of Simoeis when she had followed her father and mother to tend the sheepflocks. Therefore they called him Simoeisios; but he could not render again the care of his dear parents; he was short-lived, beaten down beneath the spear of high-hearted Ajax, who struck him as he first came forward beside the nipple of the right breast, and the bronze spearhead drove clean through the shoulder. The biggest issue in reconciling the connection between the epic fighting of the Iliad and later Greek warfare is the phalanx, or hoplite, warfare seen in Greek history well after Homer's Iliad.

While there are discussions of soldiers arrayed in semblances of the phalanx throughout the Iliad , the focus of the poem on the heroic fighting, as mentioned above, would seem to contradict the tactics of the phalanx. However, the phalanx did have its heroic aspects. The masculine one-on-one fighting of epic is manifested in phalanx fighting on the emphasis of holding one's position in formation. This replaces the singular heroic competition found in the Iliad. One example of this is the Spartan tale of picked men fighting against picked Argives. In this battle of champions, only two men are left standing for the Argives and one for the Spartans. Othryades, the remaining Spartan, goes back to stand in his formation with mortal wounds while the remaining two Argives go back to Argos to report their victory.

Thus, the Spartans claimed this as a victory, as their last man displayed the ultimate feat of bravery by maintaining his position in the phalanx. In terms of the ideology of commanders in later Greek history, the Iliad has an interesting effect. The Iliad expresses a definite disdain for tactical trickery, when Hector says, before he challenges the great Ajax:. I know how to storm my way into the struggle of flying horses; I know how to tread the measures on the grim floor of the war god. Yet great as you are I would not strike you by stealth, watching for my chance, but openly, so, if perhaps I might hit you.

However, despite examples of disdain for this tactical trickery, there is reason to believe that the Iliad , as well as later Greek warfare, endorsed tactical genius on the part of their commanders. For example, there are multiple passages in the Iliad with commanders such as Agamemnon or Nestor discussing the arraying of troops so as to gain an advantage. This is even later referred to by Homer in the Odyssey.

The connection, in this case, between guileful tactics of the Achaeans and the Trojans in the Iliad and those of the later Greeks is not a difficult one to find. Spartan commanders, often seen as the pinnacle of Greek military prowess, were known for their tactical trickery, and, for them, this was a feat to be desired in a commander. Indeed, this type of leadership was the standard advice of Greek tactical writers. Ultimately, while Homeric or epic fighting is certainly not completely replicated in later Greek warfare, many of its ideals, tactics, and instruction are.

Hans van Wees argues that the period that the descriptions of warfare relate can be pinned down fairly specifically—to the first half of the 7th century BC. The Iliad was a standard work of great importance already in Classical Greece and remained so throughout the Hellenistic and Byzantine periods. Subjects from the Trojan War were a favourite among ancient Greek dramatists. Aeschylus ' trilogy, the Oresteia , comprising Agamemnon , The Libation Bearers , and The Eumenides , follows the story of Agamemnon after his return from the war.

Homer also came to be of great influence in European culture with the resurgence of interest in Greek antiquity during the Renaissance , and it remains the first and most influential work of the Western canon. In its full form the text made its return to Italy and Western Europe beginning in the 15th century, primarily through translations into Latin and the vernacular languages. Prior to this reintroduction, however, a shortened Latin version of the poem, known as the Ilias Latina , was very widely studied and read as a basic school text. The West tended to view Homer as unreliable as they believed they possessed much more down to earth and realistic eyewitness accounts of the Trojan War written by Dares and Dictys Cretensis , who were supposedly present at the events.

These in turn spawned many others in various European languages, such as the first printed English book, the Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye. Other accounts read in the Middle Ages were antique Latin retellings such as the Excidium Troiae and works in the vernaculars such as the Icelandic Troy Saga. Even without Homer, the Trojan War story had remained central to Western European medieval literary culture and its sense of identity. Most nations and several royal houses traced their origins to heroes at the Trojan War. Britain was supposedly settled by the Trojan Brutus , for instance. William Shakespeare used the plot of the Iliad as source material for his play Troilus and Cressida , but focused on a medieval legend, the love story of Troilus , son of King Priam of Troy, and Cressida , daughter of the Trojan soothsayer Calchas.

The play, often considered to be a comedy, reverses traditional views on events of the Trojan War and depicts Achilles as a coward, Ajax as a dull, unthinking mercenary, etc. William Theed the elder made an impressive bronze statue of Thetis as she brought Achilles his new armor forged by Hephaesthus. Robert Browning 's poem Development discusses his childhood introduction to the matter of the Iliad and his delight in the epic, as well as contemporary debates about its authorship. According to Suleyman al-Boustani , a 19th-century poet who made the first Arabic translation of the Iliad to Arabic, the epic may have been widely circulated in Syriac and Pahlavi translations during the early Middle Ages.

Al-Boustani credits Theophilus of Edessa with the Syriac translation, which was supposedly along with the Greek original widely read or heard by the scholars of Baghdad in the prime of the Abbasid Caliphate , although those scholars never took the effort to translate it to the official language of the empire; Arabic. The Iliad was also the first full epic poem to be translated to Arabic from a foreign language, upon the publication of Al-Boustani's complete work in George Chapman published his translation of the Iliad , in installments, beginning in , published in "fourteeners", a long-line ballad metre that "has room for all of Homer's figures of speech and plenty of new ones, as well as explanations in parentheses.

At its best, as in Achilles' rejection of the embassy in Iliad Nine; it has great rhetorical power. In the preface to his own translation, Pope praises "the daring fiery spirit" of Chapman's rendering, which is "something like what one might imagine Homer, himself, would have writ before he arrived at years of discretion. William Cowper 's Miltonic , blank verse edition is highly regarded for its greater fidelity to the Greek than either the Chapman or the Pope versions: "I have omitted nothing; I have invented nothing," Cowper says in prefacing his translation.

In the lectures On Translating Homer , Matthew Arnold addresses the matters of translation and interpretation in rendering the Iliad to English; commenting upon the versions contemporarily available in , he identifies the four essential poetic qualities of Homer to which the translator must do justice:. After a discussion of the metres employed by previous translators, Arnold argues for a poetical dialect hexameter translation of the Iliad , like the original.

Perhaps the most fluent of them was by J. Henry Dart [] in response to Arnold. An translation by Samuel Butler was published by Longmans. Butler had read Classics at Cambridge University, graduating during Since , there have been several English translations. Richmond Lattimore 's version is "a free six-beat" line-for-line rendering that explicitly eschews "poetical dialect" for "the plain English of today. Robert Fitzgerald 's version Oxford World's Classics , strives to situate the Iliad in the musical forms of English poetry. His forceful version is freer, with shorter lines that increase the sense of swiftness and energy. Robert Fagles Penguin Classics , and Stanley Lombardo are bolder than Lattimore in adding dramatic significance to Homer's conventional and formulaic language.

Rodney Merrill 's translation University of Michigan Press , not only renders the work in English verse like the dactylic hexameter of the original, but also conveys the oral-formulaic nature of the epic song, to which that musical meter gives full value. Barry B. Powell 's translation Oxford University Press , renders the Homeric Greek with a simplicity and dignity reminiscent of the original. Peter Green translated the Iliad in Published by University of California Press. Caroline Alexander published the first full-length English translation by a woman in There are more than manuscripts of Homer.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Iliad disambiguation. Epic poem attributed to Homer. Achilles tending the wounded Patroclus Attic red-figure kylix , c. Main article: List of characters in the Iliad. See also: Category: Deities in the Iliad. Main article: Achilles and Patroclus. Further information: Homeric question and Historicity of the Iliad. Main article: Trojan War in popular culture. Further information: English translations of Homer. Ancient Greece portal. Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary. The Iliad. New York: Norton Books. The Iliad of Homer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Book 1, line , p. ISBN Spawforth The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization.

Cambridge University Press. Mar 2, []. Harvard Studies in Classical Philology. JSTOR Translated by Fagles, Robert; Knox, Bernard. New York: Penguin Books. Brooklyn College. Archived from the original December 5, The Iliad Archived from the original on Retrieved Classical Philology , Vol. The Iliad Lattimore The Classical Quarterly. ISSN Onassis Library. Retrieved 26 November The Singer of Tales.

Analysis Of Poetry Is Not A Luxury By Audre Lorde and his men finally escaped the cave by hiding on the underbellies of the sheep as they were let out of the cave. On Analysis Of Poetry Is Not A Luxury By Audre Lorde bright ridges of the helmets, horsehair plumes touched when bloody chamber summary moved their heads. Namespaces Analysis Of Poetry Is Not A Luxury By Audre Lorde Talk. He says that humans during that time were lacking what we A Day In The Texas Venue-Personal Narrative call havisham carol ann duffy.